(via skeleton)

egberts:

imagineswagons:

egberts:

i love movies about tornadoes because the people who make those movies have obviously never seen a real tornado

I thought this said movies about tomatoes

well i mean veggie tales is pretty inaccurate too

(via homocorn)

suspend:

eats when im sad, sad when i eat

(Source: suspend, via eyeballfarts)

(via homocorn)

(Source: weheartit.com, via sl0wmxdown)

wolf-food:

experimentsinmotion:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks
Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

sharks are trying to save us

wolf-food:

experimentsinmotion:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks

Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

sharks are trying to save us

(Source: popsci.com, via homocorn)

what-is-this-i-dont-even:

browningtons:

WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

OHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

(via homocorn)

(Source: wildsunshine, via eclecticpandas)

letmetouchyourbutt:

And they say romance is dead

letmetouchyourbutt:

And they say romance is dead

(via wank-t-shirt)

divaneee:

Sunset at the Pyramids, Cairo

divaneee:

Sunset at the Pyramids, Cairo

(via eclecticpandas)

(via skeleton)

(Source: inspired-for-lifee, via eclecticpandas)

most-awkward-moments:

“If the answer is false, explain why”

image

(via feat)

(via eclecticpandas)